Consulta de Guías Docentes



Academic Year/course: 2024/25

18981 - POLITICAL ACTORS AND COLLECTIVE ACTION

This is a non-sworn machine translation intended to provide students with general information about the course. As the translation from Spanish to English has not been post-edited, it may be inaccurate and potentially contain errors. We do not accept any liability for errors of this kind. The course guides for the subjects taught in English have been translated by their teaching teams


Information of the subject

Code - Course title:
18981 - POLITICAL ACTORS AND COLLECTIVE ACTION
Degree:
615 - Grado conjunto (UPF/UAM/UC3M)Filosofía, Política y Economía
724 - UPF, UAM and U3CM joint degree programme in Philosophy, Politics and Economics
Faculty:
103 - Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales
Academic year:
2024/25

1. Course details

1.1. Content area

Politics 

1.2. Course nature

Basic Training

1.3. Course level

Grado (EQF/MECU 6)

1.4. Year of study

2

1.5. Semester

First semester

1.6. ECTS Credit allotment

6.0

1.7. Language of instruction

English

1.8. Prerequisites

Knowledge of English language B2 minimum 

1.9. Recommendations

-

1.10. Minimum attendance requirement

-

1.11. Subject coordinator

Alfonso Egea De Haro

1.12. Competences and learning outcomes

1.12.1. Competences / Results of the training and learning outcomes

This subject contributes to the acquisition of the following competences:

BASIC

CB1 - That students have demonstrated possession and understanding of knowledge in an area of study which builds on the foundation of general secondary education, and is usually at a level which, while relying on advanced textbooks, also includes some aspects which involve knowledge from the cutting edge of their field of study. some aspects involving knowledge from the cutting edge of their field of study.

CB2 - Students are able to apply their knowledge to their work or vocation in a professional manner and possess the competences usually demonstrated through the development and defence of arguments and problem solving within their field of study. their field of study

CB3 - Students have the ability to gather and interpret relevant data (usually within their field of study) in order to make judgements which include reflection on relevant social, scientific or ethical issues.

CB4 - Students are able to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

CB5 - That students have developed those learning skills necessary to undertake further study with a high degree of autonomy.

TRANSVERSALS

CT1 - Formulate critical and well-argued reasoning, using precise terminology, specialised resources and documentation to support such arguments.

CT2 - Communicate effectively in different languages, both in an official language of each discipline and in the official language of each discipline.

TC3 - Debate on global and particular phenomena, relating concepts and knowledge between different disciplines after analysing the various ideological, theoretical and normative positions.

CT4 - Show knowledge of the implications of the new ideological, political, economic and technological forms at work in the contemporary world from a globalised and cosmopolitan perspective.

CT5 - Recognise diversity and multiculturalism through interdisciplinary teamwork.

SPECIFIC

CE1 - Apply the knowledge of the main theories and approaches worked on in the Degree, arguing from different perspectives and supporting the arguments in the use of methodologies of analysis, paradigms and concepts of the Social Sciences. Social Sciences.

CE2 - Interrelate the different theories involved in the disciplines of the degree and the proposals (legal, political, economic, sociological) that explain the organisation of contemporary societies.

SC3 - Analyse contemporary diversity taking into account the different disciplines of the degree by identifying problems, collecting and analysing data and interpreting the results.

CE4 - Design programmes in the different disciplines aimed at social improvement, taking into account the national and international political actors, the relations they establish with political institutions, and the socioeconomic environment of the moment.

CE5 - Evaluate political and socio-economic programmes aimed at improving the living conditions of society, taking into account the design, viability and sustainability of the programme.

CE7 - Make judgements that include ethical reflection on fundamental issues of a social, scientific and economic nature in a representative context of both international and local society.

CE8 - Evaluate programmes to improve the management and quality of public or private services and institutions, analysing the benefit and performance they have produced in local and international environments.

CE9 - Carry out case studies and apply the comparative method to analyse institutions, processes and policies in different countries, assessing international policy scenarios.

1.12.2. Learning outcomes

After passing the course, students will be able to:

- Know the main theoretical contributions on actors and actor networks. Know how actors interact. Understand the activities they carry out within political systems. Understand the main dynamics and paradigms applied to political socialisation. To understand the processes of political leadership. To understand the keys and characteristics of collective action. To understand channels of action, representation and intermediation.

- Identify the components of the political system and understand the relationships between the components of a system.

- Analyse the parts and subsystems that make up a political system and integrate the resulting information.

- Draw conclusions about different political systems.

- Determine the variables that would allow for comparative research and construct reliable indicators.

- Interrelate political and administrative systems with the social and economic sphere.

1.12.3. Course objectives

-

1.13. Course contents

  • Analysis of actors in political processes 

  • Attitudes and behaviours of individual and collective actors 

  • Individual and collective action 

  • Electoral behaviour. Public opinion 

1.14. Course bibliography

*Please, see Moodle for compulsory readings. The contents of these reading will be part of the final exam (see below). 

Aldrich, John. 1995. Why Parties? The Origins and transformation of political parties in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. D/NB/R/66 

Baumgartner, Frank R. y Beth L. Leech. 1998. Basic Interests. The Importance of Groups in Politics and in Political Science. Princeton: Princeton University Press 

Biezen, Ingrid Van. 2003. Political parties in new democracies. Londres: Palgrave- Macmillan. D/NB/R/148 

Coen, David; Wyn Grant and Graham Wilson (eds.). 2010. The Oxford Handbook of Business and Government. Oxford: Oxford University Press 

Dahl, Robert A. 1961. Who governs? New Haven: Yale University. FL/JS 1195.2 .D2 1961 

Dalton, Russell y Hans Dieter Klingemann, eds.. 2007. The Oxford Handbook of political behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press. D/NB/R/190 

Della Porta, D. y Diani, M. (1999), Social Movements. An introduction, Oxford: Blackwell. PS/2900/POR soc 

Diani, M. (1992), “The concept of social movement”, Sociological review, n. 38. Downs, Anthony. 1973 An economic theory of democracy. Harper & Row. E/1-8/1599 

Duverger, Maurice. 1984. Los Partidos Políticos. Ciudad de México: Fondo de Cultura Económica. FL/JF 2011 .D883 D/NB/R/211 (1969) 

Gunther, Richard, José Ramón Montero y Juan J. Linz. 2000. Political Parties. Oxford: Oxford University Press. D/NBf.2/128 

Hirschman, A. O. (1970). Exit, voice, and loyalty: Responses to decline in firms, organizations, and states (Vol. 25). Harvard university press. E/1-2/320 

Inglehart, R. (2005), Modernization, cultural change, and democracy the human development sequence. Cambridge University Press FL/HM 681 .I54 2005 D/NBf.4/449 

Katz, Richard y William Crotty (2004) Handbook of Political Parties. Sage: Londres. Kirchheimer,  Otto.  1966.  “The  Transformation  of  the  Western  European  Party Systems”,  en  J.  LaPalombara  y  M.  Weiner,  Political  Parties  and Political Development. Princeton University Press. D/NB/R/255 

Kitschelt, Herbert. 1989. The Logics of Party formation. Londres: Cornell University Press. 

Lijphart, Arend 1984. Democracies patterns of majoritarian and consensus government in twenty-one countries. Yale University Press. D/NBc.4/31  

Lipset, Seymour Martin; Stein Rokkan. 1967. Party Systems and voter alignments. Nueva York: Free Press. D/NB/R/248 

Maisel, Louis Sandy (2010) The Oxford handbook of american political parties and interest groups. Oxford University Press D/B/78/96/[2] 

Michels, Robert. 1959. Political parties a sociological study of the oligarchical tendencies of modern democracy. Dover. FL/JF 2049 .M62 1959 

Mair, Peter. 1997.Party System Change. Approaches and interpretations. Oxford: Clarendon Press. D/NB/R/249 

McAdam, D., John McCarthy; Mayer Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements, Cambridge University Press. D/NBc.5/150 

Norton, Philip. 1999. Parliaments and Pressure Groups in Western Europe. London: CASS 

Olson, Mancur, 1971 The logic of collective action public goods and the theory of groups. Harvard University Press. E/1-76/19184 D/Gb.1/251 

Ostrom, Elinor. A Behavioral Approach to the Rational Choice Theory of Collective Action: Presidential Address, American Political Science Association, 1997. The American Political Science Review, Vol. 92, No. 1 (Mar., 1998), pp. 1-22 

Ostrom, Elinor. Collective Action and the Evolution of Social Norms, The Journal of Economic Perspectives. Vol. 14, No. 3 (Summer, 2000), pp. 137-158 

Panebianco, Angelo 1990 Modelos de partido Organización y poder en los partidos políticos. Madrid: Alianza Editorial. FL/JF 2051 .P26 1990 

Putnam, R. D., Leonardi, R., & Nanetti, R. Y. (1994). Making democracy work: Civic traditions in modern Italy. Princeton university press. D/NBb.4/88 

Sartori, Giovanni. 1976. Parties and party systems a Framework for Analysis. University Press D/NBf.2/185 

Tarrow,Sydney, 1998 Power in Movement. Cambridge University Press FL/Sótano/54005 

Thomassen, Jacques ed. 2005. The European voter. A comparative study of modern democracies. Oxford: Oxford University Press/ECPR. D/NB/R/187 

Van der Eijk, Cees y Mark N. Franklin. 2009. Elections and voters. Londres: Palgrave Macmillan. D/NB/R/171 

Ware, Alan. 1996. Political parties and party systems. Oxford University Press D/NBf.2/211 

Watts, Duncan. 2007. Pressure Groups. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 

2. Teaching-and-learning methodologies and student workload

2.1. Contact hours

 

#horas

Contact hours (minimum 33%)

45

Independent study time

135

2.2. List of training activities

Activity

# hours

Lectures

38

Seminars

16

Practical sessions

 

Clinical sessions

 

Computer lab

 

 

 

Laboratory

 

Work placement

 

Supervised study

4

Tutorials

 

Assessment activities

2

Other

 

Presentations by the teacher will be combined with group presentations by the students as well as group discussions of the readings.  

The readings and any other materials will be uploaded in Moodle and will be available at the beginning of the semester. 

3. Evaluation procedures and weight of components in the final grade

3.1. Regular assessment

The assessment will be based on:

- The continuous assesment will be based on group and individual presentations and essays on topics related to the class subjects. The works will be presented in class and in writing.

- Final exam

 

Warning about plagiarism:

The Department of Political Science and International Relations will not tolerate any case of plagiarism or copying -nor active or passive collaboration with this type of fraudulent practices- either in exams or in any type of work carried out by students.

Plagiarism will be considered to be the reproduction of paragraphs from texts of authorship other than that of the student (Internet, books, articles, classmates' work...), when the original source is not cited.

If this type of practice is detected, the sanction will consist of failure of the subject and a request to open academic proceedings before the Dean or, where appropriate, the Rector of this University. The initiation of this procedure will have consequences for the award of the Master's degree.

3.1.1. List of evaluation activities

Evaluatory activity

%

Final exam

50%

Continuous assessment

50%

3.2. Resit

Same system as in the ordinary exam. The mark for the paper/exam will be kept in the ordinary exam, in case one of the two has been passed.

3.2.1. List of evaluation activities

Evaluatory activity

%

Final exam

50%

Continuous assessment

50%

4. Proposed workplan

A detailed version of this calendar will be published in Moodle at the beginning of the academic year.


Curso Académico: 2024/25

18981 - ACTORES POLÍTICOS Y ACCIÓN COLECTIVA (UAM)


Información de la asignatura

Código - Nombre:
18981 - ACTORES POLÍTICOS Y ACCIÓN COLECTIVA (UAM)
Titulación:
615 - Grado conjunto (UPF/UAM/UC3M)Filosofía, Política y Economía
724 - Grado conjunto (UPF/UAM/UC3M/UAB)Filosofía, Política y Economía
Centro:
103 - Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales
Curso Académico:
2024/25

1. Detalles de la asignatura

1.1. Materia

Ciencia Política

1.2. Carácter

Formación básica

1.3. Nivel

Grado (MECES 2)

1.4. Curso

2

1.5. Semestre

Primer semestre

1.6. Número de créditos ECTS

6.0

1.7. Idioma

English

1.8. Requisitos previos

No hay

1.9. Recomendaciones

Es recomendable tener, al menos, un nivel B2 de inglés.  

1.10. Requisitos mínimos de asistencia

No hay

1.11. Coordinador/a de la asignatura

Alfonso Egea De Haro

1.12. Competencias y resultados del aprendizaje

1.12.1. Competencias / Resultados del proceso de formación y aprendizaje

Esta asignatura contribuye a la adquisición de las siguientes competencias: 

BÁSICAS

CB1 - Que los estudiantes hayan demostrado poseer y comprender conocimientos en un área de estudio que parte de la base de la educación secundaria general, y se suele encontrar a un nivel que, si bien se apoya en libros de texto avanzados, incluye también

algunos aspectos que implican conocimientos procedentes de la vanguardia de su campo de estudio

CB2 - Que los estudiantes sepan aplicar sus conocimientos a su trabajo o vocación de una forma profesional y posean las competencias que suelen demostrarse por medio de la elaboración y defensa de argumentos y la resolución de problemas dentro de

su área de estudio

CB3 - Que los estudiantes tengan la capacidad de reunir e interpretar datos relevantes (normalmente dentro de su área de estudio) para emitir juicios que incluyan una reflexión sobre temas relevantes de índole social, científica o ética

CB4 - Que los estudiantes puedan transmitir información, ideas, problemas y soluciones a un público tanto especializado como no especializado

CB5 - Que los estudiantes hayan desarrollado aquellas habilidades de aprendizaje necesarias para emprender estudios posteriores con un alto grado de autonomía

TRANSVERSALES

CT1 - Formular razonamientos críticos y bien argumentados, empleando para ello terminología precisa, recursos especializados y documentación que avale dichos argumentos.

CT2 - Comunicar de manera eficaz en diferentes idiomas, tanto en una lengua oficial de cada disciplina

CT3 - Debatir sobre los fenómenos globales y particulares, relacionando los conceptos y conocimientos entre las diferentes disciplinas después de analizar las diversas posiciones ideológicas, teóricas y normativas

CT4 - Mostrar conocimientos sobre las implicaciones de las nuevas formas ideológicas, políticas, económicas y tecnológicas que actúan en el mundo contemporáneo desde una perspectiva globalizada y cosmopolita.

CT5 - Reconocer la diversidad y la multiculturalidad a través de trabajo en un equipo de carácter interdisciplinario

ESPECÍFICAS

CE1 - Aplicar el conocimiento de las principales teorías y enfoques trabajados en el Grado argumentando desde diferentes perspectivas y apoyando los argumentos en la utilización de metodologías de análisis, paradigmas y conceptos de las Ciencias

Sociales.

CE2 - Interrelacionar las distintas teorías que intervienen en las disciplinas del grado y las propuestas (jurídicas, políticas, económicas, sociológicas) que explican la organización de las sociedades contemporáneas.

CE3 - Analizar la diversidad contemporánea teniendo en cuenta las diferentes disciplinas del grado a través de la identificación de los problemas, la recogida y análisis de datos y la interpretación de los resultados.

CE4 - Diseñar programas en las diferentes disciplinas dirigidos a la mejora social teniendo en cuenta los actores políticos nacionales e internacionales, las relaciones que establecen con las instituciones políticas, y el entorno socioeconómico del momento.

CE5 - Evaluar programas políticos y socio-económicos dirigidos a la mejora de las condiciones de vida de la sociedad, teniendo en cuenta el diseño, la viabilidad y la sostenibilidad del programa.

CE7 - Emitir juicios que incluyan una reflexión ética sobre temas fundamentales de carácter social, científico y económico en un contexto representativo de la sociedad tanto internacional como local.

CE8 - Evaluar los programas de mejora en la gestión y en la calidad de los servicios públicos o privados y en las instituciones, analizando el beneficio y el rendimiento que han producido en entornos locales e internacionales.

CE9 - Realizar estudios de caso y aplicar el método comparado para analizar instituciones, procesos y políticas de diferentes países valorando escenarios de la política internacional.

1.12.2. Resultados de aprendizaje

Tras superar la asignatura, los estudiantes serán capaces de:

- Conocer las principales aportaciones teóricas sobre actores y redes de actores. Conocer cómo interactúan los actores. Conocer las actividades que desarrollan dentro de los sistemas políticos. Conocer las principales dinámicas y paradigmas aplicados a la socialización política. Conocer los procesos de liderazgo político. Conocer las claves, las características de la acción colectiva. Conocer vías de acción, representación y de intermediación.

- Identificar los componentes del sistema político y entender las relaciones entre los componentes de un sistema.

- Analizar las partes y subsistemas que componen un sistema político e integrar la información resultante.

- Extraer conclusiones sobre sistemas políticos diferentes.

- Determinar las variables que permitirían una investigación comparada y construir indicadores fiables.

- Interrelacionar los sistemas políticos y administrativos con la esfera social y económica.

1.12.3. Objetivos de la asignatura

-

1.13. Contenidos del programa

  • Análisis de los actores presentes en los procesos políticos 
  • Estudio de las actitudes y de los comportamientos de los actores individuales y colectivos 
  • Acción individual y colectiva 
  • El comportamiento electoral. La opinión pública 

1.14. Referencias de consulta

Aldrich, John. 1995. Why Parties? The Origins and transformation of political parties in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. D/NB/R/66 

Baumgartner, Frank R. y Beth L. Leech. 1998. Basic Interests. The Importance of Groups in Politics and in Political Science. Princeton: Princeton University Press 

Biezen, Ingrid Van. 2003. Political parties in new democracies. Londres: Palgrave- Macmillan. D/NB/R/148 

Coen, David; Wyn Grant and Graham Wilson (eds.). 2010. The Oxford Handbook of Business and Government. Oxford: Oxford University Press 

Dahl, Robert A. 1961. Who governs? New Haven: Yale University. FL/JS 1195.2 .D2 1961 

Dalton, Russell y Hans Dieter Klingemann, eds.. 2007. The Oxford Handbook of political behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press. D/NB/R/190 

Della Porta, D. y Diani, M. (1999), Social Movements. An introduction, Oxford: Blackwell. PS/2900/POR soc 

Lipset, Seymour Martin; Stein Rokkan. 1967. Party Systems and voter alignments. Nueva York: Free Press. D/NB/R/248 

Maisel, Louis Sandy (2010) The Oxford handbook of american political parties and interest groups. Oxford University Press D/B/78/96/[2] 

Michels, Robert. 1959. Political parties a sociological study of the oligarchical tendencies of modern democracy. Dover. FL/JF 2049 .M62 1959 

Mair, Peter. 1997.Party System Change. Approaches and interpretations. Oxford: Clarendon Press. D/NB/R/249 

McAdam, D., John McCarthy; Mayer Zald. 1996. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements, Cambridge University Press. D/NBc.5/150 

Norton, Philip. 1999. Parliaments and Pressure Groups in Western Europe. London: CASS 

Olson, Mancur, 1971 The logic of collective action public goods and the theory of groups. Harvard University Press. E/1-76/19184 D/Gb.1/251 

Ostrom, Elinor. A Behavioral Approach to the Rational Choice Theory of Collective Action: Presidential Address, American Political Science Association, 1997. The American Political Science Review, Vol. 92, No. 1 (Mar., 1998), pp. 1-22 

Ostrom, Elinor. Collective Action and the Evolution of Social Norms, The Journal of Economic Perspectives. Vol. 14, No. 3 (Summer, 2000), pp. 137-158 

Panebianco, Angelo 1990 Modelos de partido Organización y poder en los partidos políticos. Madrid: Alianza Editorial. FL/JF 2051 .P26 1990 

Putnam, R. D., Leonardi, R., & Nanetti, R. Y. (1994). Making democracy work: Civic traditions in modern Italy. Princeton university press. D/NBb.4/88 

Sartori, Giovanni. 1976. Parties and party systems a Framework for Analysis. University Press D/NBf.2/185 

Tarrow,Sydney,1998PowerinMovement.CambridgeUniversityPress FL/Sótano/54005 

Thomassen, Jacques ed. 2005. The European voter. A comparative study of modern democracies. Oxford: Oxford University Press/ECPR. D/NB/R/187 

Van der Eijk, Cees y Mark N. Franklin. 2009. Elections and voters. Londres: Palgrave Macmillan. D/NB/R/171 

Ware, Alan. 1996. Political parties and party systems. Oxford University Press D/NBf.2/211 

Watts, Duncan. 2007. Pressure Groups. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press  

Diani, M. (1992), “The concept of social movement”, Sociological review, n. 38. Downs, Anthony. 1973 An economic theory of democracy. Harper & Row. E/1-8/1599 

Duverger, Maurice. 1984. Los Partidos Políticos. Ciudad de México: Fondo de Cultura Económica. FL/JF 2011 .D883 D/NB/R/211 (1969) 

Gunther, Richard, José Ramón Montero y Juan J. Linz. 2000. Political Parties. Oxford: Oxford University Press. D/NBf.2/128 

Hirschman, A. O. (1970). Exit, voice, and loyalty: Responses to decline in firms, organizations, and states (Vol. 25). Harvard university press. E/1-2/320 

Inglehart, R. (2005), Modernization, cultural change, and democracy the human development sequence. Cambridge University Press FL/HM 681 .I54 2005 D/NBf.4/449 

Katz, Richard y William Crotty (2004) Handbook of Political Parties. Sage: Londres. Kirchheimer,  Otto.  1966.  “The  Transformation  of  the  Western  European  Party Systems”,  en  J.  LaPalombara  y  M.  Weiner,  Political  Parties  and Political Development. Princeton University Press. D/NB/R/255 

Kitschelt, Herbert. 1989. The Logics of Party formation. Londres: Cornell University Press. 

Lijphart, Arend 1984. Democracies patterns of majoritarian and consensus government in twenty-one countries. Yale University Press. D/NBc.4/31 

 

* Este es un listado de obras generales de referencia que los estudiantes pueden consultar. Las lecturas semanales concretas se darán a conocer a principios de curso.

2. Metodologías docentes y tiempo de trabajo del estudiante

2.1. Presencialidad

 

#horas

Porcentaje de actividades presenciales (mínimo 33% del total)

60

Porcentaje de actividades no presenciales

90

2.2. Relación de actividades formativas

Actividades presenciales

Nº horas

Clases teóricas en aula

38

Seminarios

16

Clases prácticas en aula

 

Prácticas clínicas

 

Prácticas con medios informáticos

 

Prácticas de campo

 

Prácticas de laboratorio

 

Prácticas externas y/o practicum

 

Trabajos académicamente dirigidos

4

Tutorías

 

Actividades de evaluación

2

Otras

 

Se combinarán sesiones magistrales, con presentaciones a cargo de los estudiantes, comentarios de las lecturas, ejercicios prácticos, y sesiones con expertos invitados.

Las lecturas y el resto de los materiales estarán disponibles en Moodle al principio del curso. 

3. Sistemas de evaluación y porcentaje en la calificación final

3.1. Convocatoria ordinaria

La evaluación estará basada en:

- La evaluación continua se basará en presentaciones y ensayos en grupo e individuales sobre temas relacionados con las asignaturas de clase. Los trabajos se presentarán en clase y por escrito..

- Examen final

Advertencia sobre plagios:

El Departamento de Ciencia Política y Relaciones Internacionales no tolerará ningún caso de plagio o copia -ni la colaboración activa o pasiva con este tipo de prácticas fraudulentas- ya sea en exámenes o en cualquier tipo de trabajos realizados por los alumnos.

Se considerará plagio la reproducción de párrafos a partir de textos de autoría distinta a la del estudiante (Internet, libros, artículos, trabajos de compañeros…), cuando no se cite la fuente original de la que provienen.

En caso de detectarse este tipo de prácticas la sanción consistirá en el suspenso de la asignatura y en la solicitud de apertura de expediente académico ante el Decano o, en su caso, el Rector de esta Universidad. La iniciación de este procedimiento tendrá consecuencias para la obtención del título de Máster.

3.1.1. Relación actividades de evaluación

Actividad de evaluación

%

Examen final (máximo 70% de la calificación final o el porcentaje que figure en la memoria)

50%

Evaluación continua

50%

3.2. Convocatoria extraordinaria

Mismo sistema que en la ordinaria. Se guardará la nota del trabajo / del examen en la ordinario, en caso de que se haya aprobado uno de los dos.

 

3.2.1. Relación actividades de evaluación

Actividad de evaluación

%

Examen final (máximo 70% de la calificación final o el porcentaje que figure en la memoria)

50%

Evaluación continua

50%

4. Cronograma orientativo

Se publicará en Moodle una versión detallada del calendario al principio de curso.